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20110706
20110706
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happened when mitt romney and jon huntsman crossed path on the fourth of july parade in new hampshire. can you stand the excitement? that's next on the sideshow. you're watching "hardball" on msnbc. 8gg@รบ >>> back to "hardball" and now to the "sideshow" return of the know nothings. foreign policy experience. who needs it? here ' 2012 hopeful herman cain, never held elective office, yet on the "today" show show. >> and i'm already talking to national security people. former intelligence people. talking to former generals and people in the military, to begin to develop ideas about how i would deal with those crises that we're in. you don't need foreign policy experience to know who your friends are and who your enemies are and you don't need foreign policy experience to know that you don't tell your enemy what your next move is. >> what you don't know won't hurt you, we're getting what i don't know won't hurt you. it's preposterous, but maybe in this environment, mildly sellable. remember, sarah palin sells a version of it and millions are buying it. >>> next, when candidates collide. mitt
on a diet. i'm going to add calories to my excluded food intake." unquote. that was jon stewart. he hit the nail on the head. for sure it's easy to make fun but what the president is trying to do with tax expenditures is no laughing matter. liberals talk about tax expenditures as though they were just getting rid of wasteful spending. first, as a legal matter, tax expenditures are not spending. outlays are checks cut from the treasury department are defined as spending under the congressional budget act. that's what spending is. yet, most tax expenditures only lose revenue and do not include an outlay portion. tax expenditures that only lose revenue contain no spending as defined by the congressional budget act and is scored by the official scorekeepers for congress. the joint committee on taxation and the congressional budget office. and second, as a policy matter twhe comes to tax -- when it comes to tax expenditures, one person's loophole is another person's opportunity to save for college and retirement, finance a home and ties to your -- taoeugts -- tithes to your church. reducing
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